NEA Delegates Vote to Take $32 Million From Teachers To Fund Political Warchest

The National Education Association, the biggest of the teachers’ unions, had its “representative assembly” this July 4th weekend.

Among the resolutions passed by convention delegates was a $10 per member assessment to fund the union’s “Ballot Measure/Legislative Crisis Fund

70.1 percent of the body, or 5,258 delegates, approved the amendment to the bylaws that authorize the $10-per-member annual assessment, 60 percent of which will be used primarily to support the Ballot Measure/Legislative Crisis fund, and the other 40 percent for national and state media campaigns. These funds can’t support campaigns but can support messaging and action against things like anti-collective bargaining legislation.

With more than 3.2 million members, the actual delegates voting for the dues increase represent 0.0016 of the union’s total membership. Despite this, the majority of delegates voting decided that the NEA will now amass a $32 million warchest to use in political advertising and election-related actions—mostly to benefit Democrats.

As a side note, the NEA, unsurprisingly, endorsed Barack Obama’s reelection bid as well.

The Representative Assembly recommended that NEA members vote to re-elect President Barack Obama in the 2012 election. They also voted for a $10 annual dues increase that will be dedicated to funding NEA’s Crisis Fund, a program designed to put money back into the states for pro-public education outreach. The increase will cost NEA members less than $1 per month, but will double the crisis fund’s annual budget.

 

4 Comments

  1. Mickey Mathis says:

    What else can you expect from the corrupt organization that cares nothing about the quality of education, only what they can steal from American taxpayers. They went to the UN and stated masturbation should be taught in first grade. My goodness what a great organization Slime and human garbabe

  2. James says:

    I note with interest that you suggest that NEA’s representative assembly isn’t representative of the union’s membership.

    What part of the process by which delegates are elected by rank-and-file union members do you think makes the delegates non-representative?

    Given your implication that the delegates’ small percentage of the overall union population makes them unrepresentative, am I to assume that every time the U.S. House of Representatives is referenced on this blog, you will similarly put scare-quotes around the word “Representatives”? After all, 435 people in a nation of 300+ million is a significantly smaller percentage of the population than 10,000 representatives of a 3.2 million member union.

    Finally, the union’s political expenditures will of course reflect the union’s interest in strengthening public schools and fighting the many attacks on teachers’ pay, professionalism, and respect—and since the Republicans are universally opposed to any enterprise that doesn’t have the potential to get a billionaire a massive ROI and, thus, oppose the very idea of schools operated by the public for the benefit of everyone, their contributions will tend to go to the significantly-less-than-perfect but still better Democrats.

    If Republicans would like to be supported by the NEA, they should condemn their party’s attempts to destroy public education and their attempts to reduce the profession of teaching to the job security and pay of your average McDonald’s workers.

    • Editor says:

      Just to be clear, the quote marks are around “representative assembly” which is really nothing more than a union convention. [For some reason the NEA seems to think it is different than the Teamsters or SEIU or any other blue collar union...it's not.]

      The fact that the NEA’s delegates passed a dues increase on its 3.2 million members is really no different than Congress increasing taxes or spending beyond its means–both deserve condemnation.

      The NEA (and other government unions) have negotiated deals that are unsustainable. Government workers have gotten away with transitioning from ‘public servant’ to ‘public master’ and if you don’t understand the resentment that causes taxpayers, then you really should have been held back a few more grades. [Must be that public education.]

      Lastly, not to make this a ‘partisan’ issue (since both parties are full of rotters), but when you began pushing political agendas in schools, you lost the faith of those who do not beat to your Marxist drum–or those who are too stupid not to recognize your poisonous Kool Aid.

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