Bummer because it could have been SOOO good. I saw this movie two weeks ago and was blown away by it. I saw the movie when it came out and I LOVED the movie. Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly. I like the book, but it's not a story. I understand the film is better – if you want to know the story, watch that instead!! Is there anything inappropriate for young readers in this book? Non-Fiction. The film was OK, but for the real deal, do read this book. Terrible writing style but a wonderful story, Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 4, 2018. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. The Human Computer Project. Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly is a 2016 William Morrow publication. I suggest you eat WELL! Be forewarned: this book has lots historical and technical information and not a lot of personal stories. It's the powerful story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. What a disappointment. Information such as 'State of Virginia was paying the colored students' tuition so that they don't bother the whites and go to colleges outside Virginia' is still shocking to know. Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly is a book not only about strong women but more. This book follows a handful of smart and tough women as they work their way through a society rigged against them in every way until they get a small break and they let their brilliance shine. Margot Lee Shetterly talked about her book, Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win … After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in. She is not writing a story - there is a difference. I don’t remember the last time I struggled to get through a book this bad. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. I really hope that the author was able to get through some revisions to work out some of the weaknesses in the writing because the story is so important -- it's about African-American women in the South who, because of the war, are temporarily able to secure jobs as 'human computers' at NACA -- which later beco. It is a product of thorough research and is full of events and anecdotes that make us re-live the tough times black women had to endure during 50s and 60s. This is an astonishing account of the considerable numbers of black women mathematicians in the US's space programme. I did finish it, but I will be avoiding anything by this author in future. The movie is based on the book (and Margot Lee Shetterly was an executive producer on the film). She doesn't put us inside Katherine's perspective, she tells us about Katherine's perspective. It is unbelievable that we did not know about the contributions of these women until now. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. I feel no satisfaction for making it through. Now a Major Motion Picture from Twentieth Century Fox, The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Unable to add item to List. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Who Helped Win the Space Race is a 2016 nonfiction book written by Margot Lee Shetterly. It is a product of thorough research and is full of events and anecdotes that make us re-live the tough times black women had to endure during 50s and 60s. Still, it's a fascinating moment in US history and these women's stories are truly remarkable. It covers an important time in history when things were changing fast and for the better. Please try again. Browse The Guardian Bookshop for a big selection of History of the Americas books and the latest book reviews from The G Buy Hidden Figures 9780008201326 by Margot Lee Shetterly for only SIGNED Hidden Figures Margot Lee Shetterly Paperback 2016 LIKE NEW. ATBroady, Reviewed in the United States on June 4, 2018. HIDDEN FIGURES: The Story of the African-American Women W... by Margot Shetterly. Just wow. Glad the author brought to light these extraordinarily talented “human computers”. Reviewed in the United States on March 1, 2017. This was such an extraordinary, exhilarating and important story to tell, but the writing was so dry, repetitive and full of platitudes that it began to dull the edges of this sharp tale. This shows how history and historians are extremely selective and do not stray from the pre-established political narrative. However, I hadn't even noticed. So thrilled that this is a book! Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Highly recommended. This is a history lesson for all of us not to repeat mistakes. The uplifting, amazing true story—a New York Times bestseller! or yes? I liked this book very much. Her first book, Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race (2016), is about African-American women mathematicians working at NASA who were instrumental to the success of the United States space program. Before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as ‘Human Computers’, calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievement. This edition of Margot Lee Shetterly’s acclaimed book is perfect for young students. This book utterly disproves that, It is also an account of the civil rights movement in the US and of the discrimination that makes these women's achievements all the more remarkable. See all 25 questions about Hidden Figures…, Popsugar 2020 - Books about or by Women in STEM, 2017: What People Born in the 1980s Have Read in 2017, ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣, “‘We Have Always Fought’: Challenging the ‘Women, Cattle and Slaves’ Narrative”, Janelle Monáe, Margot Lee Shetterly, and Melissa Harris-Perry on the Importance of Portraying Nuanced Black Female Characters, [Poll Ballot] Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly - 4 stars, Hidden Figures: Reviews by 2020 Reading Challengers, Readers’ Top Histories and Biographies of the Last 5 Years. It's also a very odd mix of docudrama style, historical detail and annoying imagined conversations which just make the characters feel even more 2 dimensional than before. The movie is done very well and I commend all those involved in its production including the talented stars. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 18, 2017. This shows how history and historians are extremely selective and do not stray from the pre-established political narrative. Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly is a remarkable account of a small number of intelligent, hard-working, driven and admirable African-American women who made significant contributions to the Space Race and to the fields of math, science and engineering. December 6th 2016 Margot Shetterly is writing a history. I didn’t connect with any of the characters because it truly jumped all over the place. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. It's the powerful story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. I enjoy nonfiction and I loved the subject matter the author went after. Refresh and try again. A talk with Margot Lee Shetterly, the author of 'Hidden Figures' Margot Lee Shetterly's bestseller is now an Oscar-nominated movie. However, this was just so dry. I was miserable. The efforts of many courageous people that paved the road of social freedom for women and black people are amazing. An inspiring story. I was thinking while reading it of the recent furore at google over a programmer who believed that women find it hard to apply the necessary analytical skills to become programmers. I wonder watching the news...I am glad they finally got some kind of recognition for their service and tenacity. Facilities like Langley began to hire qualified women in large numb… Set amid the civil rights movement, the never-before-told true story of NASA’s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in America’s space program. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. The convergence / overlap of the lives of these women with the collective dreams of the nation and its obsessive space race are fraught with contradiction and celebration. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. No matter your gender, ethnicity, race or creed, you need this in your life. My preference is the book mostly because of the additional information provided about Aunt Katherine. Bring your club to Amazon Book Clubs, start a new book club and invite your friends to join, or find a club that’s right for you for free. There was an error retrieving your Wish Lists. Margot Shetterly is writing a history. Author Shetterly and illustrator Freeman bring the incredibly inspiring true story of four black female mathematicians who helped NASA launch men into space to picture book readers in this adaptation of Shetterly's #1 New York Times bestseller, the basis for the Oscar-nominated film. Recovering the legacy of all of NASA's pioneering human computers and female mathematicians. The efforts of many courageous people that paved the road of social freedom for women and black people are amazing. She reads at a high school level. The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. They, and all the other West Computers, worked unbelievably hard and with often flawless accuracy, and were responsible for calculating the math for the designs of numerous planes and missiles, and for getting men into orbit and to the moon. .orange-text-color {color: #FE971E;} Explore your book, then jump right back to where you left off with Page Flip. Look forward to the movie! Reading this book was torture. I want EVERYBODY to read this. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly is a book not only about strong women but more. I first heard of Katherine Johnson just a few months ago, when I was watching a Sci-Fi time travel series on television. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where her father worked at Langley Research Center, on which the book is centered. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 22, 2017. No, but seriously, did you expect anything less of a rating from me? I just finished this book and could not have articulated my feelings about it better myself! Thank you! Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. She also gives histories of many of the people and she goes into many of the historical backgrounds that got us here starting with World Wa. She is not writing a story - there is a difference. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly is a book not only about strong women but more. It will move you, it will surprise you, it will frustrate you and it will inspire you. Revealing the inspirational untold story of female African-American mathematicians working at NASA during the 1960s, the film Hidden Figures is based on a book by Margot Lee Shetterly. I saw the movie before I read the book, and I am honestly not sure whether that was a good or bad thing. There was a problem loading your book clubs. Yet the tone is at times so flowery and glib that the women become caricatured heroes as opposed to complex women in extraordinary times. She doesn't put us inside Katherine's perspective, she tells us about Katherine's perspective. It also analyzes reviews to verify trustworthiness. 5.0 average based on 2 product ratings. Hidden Figures is a must read. Nothing is inappropriate. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. of all things! $29.99. I was in the minority for having finished the book. An Amazing book. Margot Lee Shetterly (born June 30, 1969) is an American non-fiction writer who has also worked in investment banking and media startups. Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow , Wow. The lack of focus in the writing was exhausting. .orange-text-color {font-weight:bold; color: #FE971E;}Enjoy features only possible in digital – start reading right away, carry your library with you, adjust the font, create shareable notes and highlights, and more. New Dominion Bookshop in Charlotteville, Virginia works with Margot to offer autographed copies of Hidden Figures. Reading the book just gave me even more details about the African American women who came out as human computers (I had no idea that was where the word computers came from, they computed so were seen as computers) and helped shaped the United States space program. Peppered through with facts and fiction and more facts. Many movie goers who only see the movie will miss out on a number of opportunities to see more realistically Aunt Katherine's nature, attitudes, and life's perspectives on work, family, and race. Short of just gushing about the brainy women featured in this engaging book, I'll say that I wish I could have known some of these women. Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures. It is a book about society, struggles, overcoming prejudices, spirit, strong will, and brains. Who knew? Margot Shetterly, author of "Hidden Figures" (Image credit: William Morrow) Shetterly's new book, "Hidden Figures" (William Morrow, 2016) follows … I should've stuck with my gut. I have to say, I didn't think I would like this book. "The title 'Hidden Figures' is a reference to the book by Margot Lee Shetterly and the film released in 2016 of the same name, and it has a double meaning," April Stafford, director of the U.S. Mint's Office of Design Management, said at a Sept. 23 meeting of the … Start by marking “Hidden Figures” as Want to Read: Error rating book. Most of the ladies went to see the movie. I had occasion to meet the author who is the niece of one of these remarkable women. Shetterly started working on the book in 2010. Learn more about author Margot Lee Shetterly at Margotleeshetterly.com. Three of these women are followed in detail: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson and Katherine Johnson. Before Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as ‘Human Computers’, calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. I personally did love it, though a friend of mine found the Americanisms a bit hard to take (too slangy). Short of just gushing about the brainy women featured in this engaging book, I'll say that I wish I could have known some of these women. I did not expect to become tearful upon finishing a history book, especially one about mathematicians and engineers, but I did. The book was as amazing as the movie. What I especially appreciated was the way Shetterley always grounded the story in history. Ana astonishing account of brilliant women and much much better than the film. William Morrow Paperbacks; Media tie-in edition (December 6, 2016), Fascinating book; very different from the movie, Reviewed in the United States on February 2, 2017. I saw the movie when it came out and I LOVED the movie. The #1 New York Times Bestseller. Hidden Figures The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. The movie follows the story of three women involved in the race to propel humankind into space… Enjoy a great reading experience when you buy the Kindle edition of this book. I wish the writing was more creative, narrative-driven and sensory to give us a real sense of who they really were as opposed to casting them as emblematic symbols of a people and a nation. This is an excellent nonfiction novel to learn about the African-American women who largely contributed to America's race to space. This is a wonderful story but so badly told. Wow. This is a history lesson for all of us not to repeat mistakes. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race is a 2016 nonfiction book by Margot Lee Shetterly. It's a story you need to hear. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. She lives in … Thanks to Margot Shetterly for introducing us to these (s)heroes of rocket science(! Something went wrong. Compelling social more than technical history, Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 14, 2018. Please try again. She sold the movie rights while still working on the book, and it was adapted as a feature film of the same name, Hid… Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures. This edition of Margot Lee Shetterly’s acclaimed book is perfect for young readers. Segregated from their white counterparts, these ‘coloured computers’ used pencil and paper to write the equations that would launch rockets and astronauts, into space. It's got SO much more in it, and its so revealing about the race divisions in America of the time. It never got better. During World War Two, the gradual dismantling of the Jim Crow system of racial segregation began, asthe demands of the war economy brought African-Americans and women into jobs and industries from which they had previously been excluded. Since the success of “Hidden Figures,” she committed to publish two more books in a trilogy loosely shaped around charismatic mid-century African-American figures. I liked this book very much. The #1 New York Times bestseller. The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. AUTOGRAPHED COPIES. The book was as amazing as the movie. I mean it is fascinating. More about Margot Lee Shetterly. It is a book about society, struggles, overcoming prejudices, spirit, strong will, and brains. Three of these women are followed in detail: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson and Katherine Johnson. “Their dark skin, their gender, their economic status--none of those were acceptable excuses for not … Reviewed in the United States on January 12, 2017, My comments are somewhat bias since Katherine Johnson is my aunt. With new jobs at the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Hampton, Virginia, they finally had a shot at jobs that would push their skills to the limits. I'll start by acknowledging how much I enjoyed this book. It really is a revelation, even if like me you think you know what went on. I know in many ways we still have a long way to go, but this book shows how much has changed for the better through the persistance of those unlikely to be given a chance. shipping: + $3.86 shipping . This was such an extraordinary, exhilarating and important story to tell, but the writing was so dry, repetitive and full of platitudes that it began to dull the edges of this sharp tale. 5. The author bounces around and, combined with the intensive technical language, whole passages are muddled with confusion. Coming from a STEM background myself, I found it fascinating to hear about the personal and the professional lives of the women who worked at NACA (before it was known as NASA). Hidden Figures The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition. It is a book about society, struggles, overcoming prejudices, spirit, strong will, and brains. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. An Uplifting Story - and some very readable information about the US aerospace industry and space program, Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 30, 2017. Clearly the main story revolves around the incredible achievements of the ladies entering the space program and playing such a vital but unsung role. Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden—four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. Reaching for the Moon: The Autobiography of NASA Mathematician Katherine Johnson, Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race, Code Girls: The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers of World War II, Meet You in Hell: Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and the Bitter Partnership That Changed America, Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars, “Meticulous… the depth and detail that are the book’s strength make it an effective, fact-based rudder with which would-be scientists and their allies can stabilize their flights of fancy. Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures . more info. It is a case of getting one slice of pie when you could get two slices. This was especially true of the aeronautics and defense industry, which was crucial to the American war effort. Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens. I read Hidden Figures for a local book club. .orange-text-color {font-weight:bold; color: #FE971E;}Ask Alexa to read your book with Audible integration or text-to-speech. It's such a shame because there really is a wonderful true story of strong, intelligent black women in there, who triumph despite all the odds. This book is kickass. I like the book, but it's not a story. The author is very empathic and paints wonderful portraits of all the key characters. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. That being said, certain aspects of it disappointed me. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations, Select the department you want to search in. So many friends told me that it wasn't what I thought, and one friend literally pushed her copy into my hands, and guess what, my fellow book nerds?? So all the way through reading "Hidden Figures", I was asking myself why haven't I ever heard about the African American Women Scientist involved in the US Space Program from it's earliest days! To order autographed copies, please email ndb [at] cstone.net, or call (434) 295-2552. Buy Hidden Figures: The Untold Story of the African American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race by Shetterly, Margot Lee (ISBN: 9780008201326) from Amazon's Book Store. 4. “Women, on the other hand, had to wield their intellects like a scythe, hacking away against the stubborn underbrush of low expectations.”, “Katherine Johnson knew: once you took the first step, anything was possible.”, Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Nonfiction (2017), Andrew Carnegie Medal Nominee for Nonfiction (2017), Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for History & Biography (2016). I was excited for the book. 6-8, 9-12 U. Genre. Of course, some of the things must have been embellished (or not! In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future. Set amid the civil rights movement, the never-before-told true story of NASA’s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in America’s space program. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Hidden Figures Summary. Thanks to Margot Shetterly for introducing us to these (s)heroes of rocket science(!) A very well researched book on a fascinating topic very few of us knew about until now. As a reading experience, I rated the book three stars; I did not have an emotional connection that compelled me to read on. They did the calculations that helped get men into space. I really hope that the author was able to get through some revisions to work out some of the weaknesses in the writing because the story is so important -- it's about African-American women in the South who, because of the war, are temporarily able to secure jobs as 'human computers' at NACA -- which later becomes NASA, despite living in a Jim Crow era of extreme racism and segregation. As someone who hates math with a passion, I did not think I would enjoy it but hey I wanna see the movie so I gotta read the book. This really is a history and I learned so much from it I had no clue about. 3. It is also very interesting to read about this era; since the kids of today are born with an ipad; but before all this; at a time where there wasn't a computer as we know it, there were Human computers. Just a suggestion, but let your daughter read whatever she wants! Both scientifically and as people. This is a really uplifting read. This hardworking, earnest book is the perfect foil for the glamour still to come.” (. Welcome back. It's amazing. Writer, researcher, and entrepreneur Margot Lee Shetterly is the author ofHidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race(William Morrow/HarperCollins). Check out our revolutionary side-by-side summary and analysis. by Margot Lee Shetterly On Sale: 09/06/2016 Format: You girls rock(et)! An Amazing book. .orange-text-color {color: #FE971E;} Discover additional details about the events, people, and places in your book, with Wikipedia integration. Hidden Figures is their story. Prime members enjoy FREE Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle books. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. I'm sure there are countless other untold stories about women and minorities. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. I'm sure there are countless other untold stories about women and minorities. Audiobook Free Hidden Figures Written By: Margot Lee Shetterly. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Hidden Figures tells the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African-American women who blazed the trail for others to follow in the fields of mathematics and engineering at NASA. My original "review" was this - two flippant little sentences to serve as a placeholder for an eventual "real" review: Incredible look at some of the brilliant female African-American mathematicians and engineers who worked for NASA and its predecessor in a time when integration was being challenged, schools were being closed in Virginia, and the portrayal of mathematicians and scientists was usually a bunch of white guys in shirts and ties. Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. Also some of the facts that the author was trying to get across were so repeated their value lost meaning. This book was everything I thought it would be, which unfortunately is why I didn't want to read it. It is also very interesting to read about this era; since the kids of today are born with an ipad; but before. To see what your friends thought of this book. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women. Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures. I gave the book five stars for the importance of the subject, new information shared, and for the author's extensive research. They, and all the other West Computers, worked unbelievably hard and with often flawle. Please try your request again later. The reader is always reminded of what else is going on in the world as well as other American historical events. A fascinating subject. “These women were both ordinary and they were extraordinary,” says Margot Lee Shetterly. .orange-text-color {font-weight:bold; color: #FE971E;}View high quality images that let you zoom in to take a closer look. I was excited for the book. about. Please try again. I mean a book about mathematicians? Top subscription boxes – right to your door, © 1996-2020, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. In Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race (public library), Margot Lee Shetterly tells the untold story of these brilliant women, once on the frontlines of our cultural leaps and since sidelined by the selective collective memory we call history. Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. by William Morrow Paperbacks, Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race. Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race - Kindle edition by Shetterly, Margot Lee, Freeman, Laura. It reminds us also how much was achieved in aerospace before 90% of R&D started to get directed to mobile phones and really amazing technology took a back seat. It is unbelievable that we did not know about the contributions of these women until now. From my youth, I have always been interested in the space race. If you've seen the film based on this book, please read the book. It covers an important time in history when things were changing fast and for the better. 2.0K views. This is a history lesson for all of us not to repeat mistakes. Please tell me the movie was based on the book and not the other way around? It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades as they faced challenges, forged alliances, and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future. Margot is telling and not showing. Share - Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly (2018, Hardcover) Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly (2018, Hardcover) 2 product ratings. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. Need help with Chapter 1: A Door Opens in Margot Lee Shetterly's Hidden Figures? 2 users rated this 5 out of 5 stars 2. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. 0 users rated this 4 out of 5 stars 0. OUAT Founder and Owner Ryan Heathcock spoke with Margot Lee Shetterly, author of the book, Hidden Figures. It felt very clinical as opposed to experiencing life with these women. Now a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner. By Margot Lee Shetterly. The biographical text follows the lives of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan, and Mary Jackson, three mathematicians who worked as computers (then a job description) at NASA, during the sp… Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. The #1 New York Times Bestseller. I had occasion to meet the author who is the niece of one of these remarkable women. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. How far we have come in the last 100 years! Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in her book Hidden Figures. She lives in … Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Shetterly, a 1991 graduate of the McIntire School, and her husband, writer Aran Shetterly, live in Charlottesville. We’d love your help. I loved the movie, and I loved the book, but they are very different. She lives in … It's really exciting to see how the Langley Research Institute continues to grow and expand over the arch of the story, and to see how the laws transform during the course of these women's careers. Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. Coming from a STEM background myself, I found it fascinating to hear about the personal and the professional lives of the women who worked at NACA (before it was known as NASA). Grades. Man I really really wanted to like this book. Originally math teachers in the South’s segregated public schools, these gifted professionals answered Uncle Sam’s call during the labor shortages of World War II. I am actually excited in this case that there's a major motion picture b/c I think it'll bring the narrative structure into clearer relief -- the lives of the main characters -- Dorothy, Katherine and Mary -- are so intertwined and overlapping that it's hard to keep track of whose story is being told at any given moment. This book follows a handful of smart and tough women as they work their way through a society rigged against them in every way until they get a small. $19.99. However, I'm afraid the author's writing style is worse than bad and she does not do these women justice at all. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia. They deserved more credit then but society still wasn't ready and is it still? Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly … ), still, the inspiration is there! ORDER YOUR COPY OF THE #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER THAT INSPIRED THE fox movie! In 1943, in the midst of World War II, the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Hampton, VA seeks to hire hundreds of junior physicists and mathematicians to help in … My young DD is passionate about mathematics and is dying to read this book, and prefers to read the original versus the young readers version. Although women were treated as equal in many parts of the world such as the Soviet Union, in US women were treated as lower in rank; and segregation was considered the norm until 2nd civil rights act was signed in 1964. It really is, but don't expect some sweeping story. The book takes place from the 1930s through the 1960s when some viewed women as inferior to men. It is literally everything I have wanted in a science history book for a while. Her new book Hidden Figures shines light on the inner details of these women’s lives and accomplishments. I have seen the movie twice and read the book. Moving from World War II through NASA’s golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War and the women’s rights movement, ‘Hidden Figures’ interweaves a rich history of mankind’s greatest adventure with the intimate stories of five courageous women whose work forever changed the world. Margot is telling and not showing. Each paragraph would introduce 6 new characters and go on a tangent in a completely different direction. She also gives histories of many of the people and she goes into many of the historical backgrounds that got us here starting with World War II. I would get through a chapter and have to walk away from it. Free shipping .

hidden figures margot lee shetterly

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