Found on magnolia cones or sweetgum fruit; spores smooth, elliptic, inamyloid: 39. Cap viscid; gills typically sinuate to notched, with a white margin; odor often radish-like; spores smooth, thick-walled, dextrinoid: Genus Hebeloma Cap white, tan, brownish or reddish, usually distinctly scaly in age; gills free, white, close; partial veil present, usually leaving a ring on stalk; terrestrial, usually growing on dead plant debris (leaves, needles, wood chips, etc. Cap: 7–30 cm in diameter. Stalk quite slender and fragile but not brittle as described above; spores smooth, with an apical pore, the apex often flattened: Genus, 14. Mushroom typically white overall; cap dry, smooth, thick-fleshed; gill layer readily separable from flesh of the cap; base of stalk attached to copious white mycelium which binds together a substantial mass of dead leaves/needles etc. Spore print yellowish olive to olive-yellow when fresh, drying yellowish cinnamon; cap smooth to finely velvety, 3" (7.5 cm) wide at most, yellow overall; gills orangish yellow, forked, crossveined and distinctly corrugated, wrinkled or wavy; gill layer easily separable from the cap flesh; odor unpleasant; spores ellipsoid, smooth, inamyloid: 26. Cap 1/2-1/1/2" (1.2-4 cm) wide, zoned with long radially arranged hairs; gills close, narrow, nearly free from the stalk; stalk hairy, hollow; spores 4-6 x 3-5 um; on decaying hardwood: 41. 6. Next, oyster mushrooms are unique in that they have decurrent gills. Spore print white to cream: 28. Cap more or less white, fairly robust, up to 6" (15 cm) wide, typically cracked or with visible water spots in age; stalk present; usually growing on living hardwoods; spore print cream; spores smooth, globose to elliptic, inamyloid: Genus. Spores: Spores can be found inside round sacks Size: Can grow up to 10 inches or more in diameter. Beug, M. W., Shaw, M. & Cochran, K. W. Thirty-plus years of mushroom poisoning, Summary of the approximately 2,000 reports in the NAMA case registry. Cap dry, finely hairy, bluish black, typically less than ½” (1.3 cm) wide; flesh rubbery-gelatinous; gills gray to nearly black; found on the undersurface of decaying logs; spores round, smooth, inamyloid: Resupinatus applicatus (Bataille : Fries) S.F. They may be "decurrent", meaning they run down the stem as with oyster mushrooms. Gills extremely crowded, lavender; cap also lavender or lavender-tinted, at least when young; spores smooth, amyloid: 41. 41. Cap flesh-pink to pale vinaceous pink, becoming pale pinkish brown to pinkish tan or yellowish tan at the center, less than 2" (5 cm) wide; margin usually inrolled at first; flesh thin, white; gills white to cream, close to crowded, attached at first, becoming decurrent in age, finely scalloped, becoming eroded in age; stalk less than 2" (5 cm) long, no more than ¼” (7 mm) thick, pink overall at first, becoming dingy yellow to yellowish tan, with a narrow white zone at the apex, typically coated with long white hairs near or at the base; often growing in clusters; spores smooth, elliptic to oval, inamyloid: 45. Not as in either of the above choices: 23. Cap typically glabrous; gills usually notched or slightly decurrent, often white-fringed; membranous partial veil present when young; stalk 1/8" (3 mm) thick at most; spores warty or at least roughened, with a plage: Genus Galerina 18. Cap convex, less than 4" (10 cm) wide; cap and stalk scaly to powdery or granular; partial veil more fibrous than membranous, leaving at most a zone of fibers near the top of the stalk; spores smooth, with or without an apical pore: 10. Not as in any of the above choices; stalk slender and fragile or brittle: 13. 45. Other identification features: Cap. 28. In the forest, caps can be completely invisible, making only a bulge covered by duff and soil. Cap less than 2" (5 cm) wide, typically almost fleshless, distinctly striate, often splitting radially at maturity, usually with fine clear hairs (use a hand lens); gills typically well spaced; spores smooth, with an apical pore: Genus. This easy-to-spot mushroom is often mistaken for the common oyster until there is closer examination (common oyster gills are decurrent, elm oysters are not decurrent). Solitary to clustered on deciduous wood; gills decurrent, white discoloring yellowish, covered at first by a white membranous veil; cap 2–5" (5–12.5 cm) wide, coated with tiny matted grayish fibrils on a whitish ground color, becoming slightly scurfy and whitish to dull yellowish tan overall in age; flesh white; odor fragrant to slightly pungent; taste not distinctive; stalk eccentric to central, whitish, sometimes with a … 9. Spore print pink, tan, yellow, or darker: 3. The true position of this rare mushroom is not known, and may deserve a genus of its own. 34. ); spores smooth, dextrinoid, amyloid or inamyloid: Genus. Entire mushroom very tough, fibrous to leathery or corky, usually found growing on living hardwoods; cap surface smooth at first, becoming cracked and/or water-spotted at maturity; spores smooth, globose to elliptic, inamyloid: Genus. British Columbia: 604-682-5050 or 1-800-567-8911. Cap usually scaly, often viscid; gills attached; fibrous to membranous partial veil present, usually leaving a ring on the stalk or remnants on the cap margin; lower stalk scaly; often robust and in large clusters on decaying wood; spores smooth, usually with an apiculus and/or an apical pore which, in some species, causes the spore to appear truncate: Genus Pholiota Spore print yellow or yellowish; cap greenish yellow to brownish; gills yellow, forked and crossveined and only slightly corrugate or wrinkled at most; gill layer easily separable from cap flesh; spores elliptic, smooth, inamyloid or dextrinoid: Paxillus panuoides (Fries : Fries) Fries 2 Select mushrooms without red on the cap or stem. Oyster mushrooms have white gills. Entire mushroom usually very moist; most species semitranslucent and colorful (yellow, orange, red, purple) with colors fading conspicuously as specimens dry out; gills appearing waxy, thickened, attached, often distant and crossveined; gills typically leaving a waxy residue on one’s fingers when rubbed; partial veil rarely present; most species terrestrial; not usually clustered; spores smooth, inamyloid: Genus, 3. All content at americanmushrooms.com is Copyright © 2006, 2007 by David W. Fischer. 4. 45. 26. Spore print with an orange to red tint when fresh, ranging from bright orange to rust or reddish brown: 4. Spore print white to cream, but mushroom not otherwise as in any of the above choices; gills attached; other characters exceedingly variable: 4. 5. Cap 3" (7.5 cm) wide at most, stalk 3/16" (5 mm) wide at most: 41. Cap brown, sometimes white to yellowish or lilac, radially fibrous, often splitting at the margin, often umbonate, usually less than 2–½” (6.5 cm) wide; gills with a pale-fringed edge; partial veil a cortina, rarely leaving a ring on the stalk; odor often spermatic, sometimes fruity; spores smooth to bumpy, sometimes angular, lacking an apical pore: Genus. 35. Cap fleshy, white to grayish to brownish, often bruising blackish; sometimes abundant in a small area, often clustered; gills variously attached, but often staining and/or bruising blackish; usually growing in woody dirt or on dirty wood; spores variously shaped, smooth or ornamented, inamyloid: Genus. 7. Cap smooth, white, not scaly; spore print white to pale pink; growing on lawns or grassy areas; spores with an apical pore: Lepiota naucinoides Peck Partial veil fibrous to cortinate (check young specimens): 17. Cap typically convex, 2½” (6.5 cm) wide at most, hygrophanous, usually with tiny white veil patches, especially near the margin; fibrous or membranous partial veil present when young; spore print pale yellowish to cinnamon-brown; spores smooth, lacking a pore: Genus Tubaria The colour is white to cream, often with brown stains. 31. Cap and gills orange overall; gills somewhat decurrent, repeatedly and regularly forked but not crossveined; growing on or about decaying conifer wood or needle litter; spores elliptic to cylindric, smooth, mostly dextrinoid: 34. Gills often mottled; stalk slender and decidedly brittle, easily snapping in half; partial veil sometimes evident; spores smooth to roughened, with an apical pore: Genus, 25. from the book 7. The spore print is pink. Cap brownish yellow to yellowish brown with a white bloom, especially at the center; gills becoming distinctly rust-colored, spore print distinctly rust-colored; membranous partial veil present, leaving a membranous ring on the stalk; spores warty to wrinkled, dextrinoid: 12. 44. 10. Gills becoming bright orange, spore print bright orange; flesh bitter; cap blackish with KOH; spores roughened to warty, lacking an apical pore and lacking a plage: Genus, 10. 27. There is also one mushroom with a distinctly greenish spore print (Chlorophyllum molybdites, the Green-spored Lepiota), and one with a distinctly … 16. Cap more or less white, fairly robust, up to 6" (15 cm) wide, typically cracked or with visible water spots in age; stalk present; usually growing on living hardwoods; spore print cream; spores smooth, globose to elliptic, inamyloid: Genus Hypsizygus Dried mushrooms reviving when moistened; cap convex to umbilicate to radially grooved, like an umbrella, smooth to finely velvety, white, gray or brown to orangish or reddish; flesh typically so thin as to be virtually nonexistent; gills variously attached to the stalk or to a collar; stalk typically bristle-like, always thin, less than 1/16" (2 mm) thick; usually growing on dead plant matter (wood, leaves, needles, etc. Gills strongly decurrent; entire mushroom orange overall, normally luminescing green when fresh (view in complete darkness for five–ten minutes); spores smooth, globose to subglobose, inamyloid: Omphalotus olearius (De Candolle : Fries) Singer 4. Partial veil distinctly two-layered, essentially composed of two separate partial veils: 35. Not as in any of the above choices: 44. The stipe is 3 to 8 cm (1.2 to 3.1 in) long × 4–15 mm thick, and white. 14. 3. 5. Cap less than 2" (5 cm) wide, typically almost fleshless, distinctly striate, often splitting radially at maturity, usually with fine clear hairs (use a hand lens); gills typically well spaced; spores smooth, with an apical pore: Genus. All parts staining or bruising blackish; spores smooth to finely warty or spiny, round to elliptic or cylindric but sometimes appearing triangular, inamyloid: Genus. 25. 17. The flesh of the Yellow Swamp Russula slowly bruises grey-black with age. 12. Poison Control: Gills often mottled; stalk slender and decidedly brittle, easily snapping in half; partial veil sometimes evident; spores smooth to roughened, with an apical pore: Genus. Lactarius 17. ; odor often disagreeable or farinaceous; taste bitter or farinaceous; spores amyloid-warted to variously amyloid-ornamented, plage absent: Genus Leucopaxillus It was growing under Jack pine trees, but I did not. Gills often mottled; stalk slender and decidedly brittle, easily snapping in half; partial veil sometimes evident; spores smooth to roughened, with an apical pore: Genus Psathyrella Warning: Before eating any wild mushrooms, be sure of their identity. Cap smooth, convex to flat, often with an umbo, texture like leather, white to yellowish to dark brown, often hygrophanous; gills crowded, attached, never decurrent, white; stalk usually tall, slender, longitudinally striate; often found on humus, sometimes on lawns, never on decaying wood; spores warty, with a plage, and amyloid: Genus, 8. 24. Not as in any of the above choices; partial veil absent: 36. 27. Poison Centres provide free, expert medical advice 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Cap 1/2-1/1/2" (1.2-4 cm) wide, zoned with long radially arranged hairs; gills close, narrow, nearly free from the stalk; stalk hairy, hollow; spores 4-6 x 3-5 um; on decaying hardwood: Crinipellis zonata (Peck) Patouillard Partial veil fibrous to cortinate (check young specimens): 15. Partial veil more or less membranous (check young specimens): 21. 3. 8. 43. Gills attached but sometimes appearing free; partial veil absent; cap conic to broadly conic when young, becoming bell-shaped to nearly flat with an umbo in age, dark brown, hairy; stalk dark brown, hairy; base of stalk with bristle-like hairs; spores 13–16 x 7–9 µm, angular in all views; solitary, scattered or in groups on leaf litter or decaying hardwood; edibility unknown: 5. Partial veil more or less fibrous or cortinate (check young specimens): 22. 6. 43. 24. Cap variously colored, usually flat at maturity, margin typically incurved to inrolled at first; gills variously attached but never decurrent, typically white, narrow and close; stalk slender but not hair-like; spores smooth, inamyloid or dextrinoid, usually elliptic to lacrymoid: Genus Collybia Cap fibrous to finely scaly, usually yellow to reddish orange; flesh typically distinctly yellowish; gills often yellowish or orangish, gill edges often appearing ragged or fringed; spores smooth, inamyloid: Genus. 26. Cap typically convex, 2½” (6.5 cm) wide at most, hygrophanous, usually with tiny white veil patches, especially near the margin; fibrous or membranous partial veil present when young; spore print pale yellowish to cinnamon-brown; spores smooth, lacking a pore: Genus, 11. Not as in any of the above choices; growing on decaying remains of another mushroom, the “Shaggy Mane” (Coprinus comatus): 10. Cap often pinkish, usually finely scaly when dry; gills attached to decurrent, pinkish or flesh-colored to purplish, usually appearing thick and/or waxy; stalk fibrous, tough; spores inamyloid, minutely spiny except smooth in one species: Genus Laccaria Not as in any of the above choices; growing on wood: 10. 16. Entire mushroom usually very moist; most species semitranslucent and colorful (yellow, orange, red, purple) with colors fading conspicuously as specimens dry out; gills appearing waxy, thickened, attached, often distant and crossveined; gills typically leaving a waxy residue on one’s fingers when rubbed; partial veil rarely present; most species terrestrial; not usually clustered; spores smooth, inamyloid: Genus Hygrophorus 4. Odour: Mild. ), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), often only visible as a raised piece of forest floor; ectomycorrhizal4. Not as in any of the above choices; growing on decaying remains of another mushroom, the “Shaggy Mane” (Coprinus comatus): Psathyrella epimyces (Peck) Smith 41. Spore print greenish, lacking brown tones: Genus. Gills extremely crowded, lavender; cap also lavender or lavender-tinted, at least when young; spores smooth, amyloid: Baeospora myriadophylla (Peck) Singer Ringless honey mushrooms produce white colored spores that can be seen on the ground beneath their caps. Gills attached, sinuate or decurrent; partial veil absent: 6. The mushroom is grayish white and grows up to 4 centimeters across. 5. 36. 12. Growing in clusters of 10 or more specimens; caps yellowish to pinkish brown, with minute erect hairs at the center; gills slightly decurrent; stalk base usually tapered; spores smooth, inamyloid: 40. As above except cap bright pale pink to flesh-pink becoming yellowish tan; stalk base sometimes coated with shorter matted whitish fibrils; not growing in clusters: Calocybe carnea (Bulliard : Fries) Donk (see comments under Calocybe persicolor) Hygrophoropsis, a gilled bolete - perhaps the brightest orange gills of any mushroom. A pale gray-white cap and decurrent, pale pink gills, combined with a strong smell of fresh bread dough, distinguish this species. Gills distinctly free; volva and partial veil both absent; growing on wood, sawdust, or other woody substrate; spores smooth, inamyloid: Genus. This mushroom grew along one of the bike trails near Bragg Creek. Spore print pale yellowish cream to orangish yellow; otherwise not as in the previous choice; spores smooth, cylindric, inamyloid: Genus Lentinus Cap and lower stalk densely coated with rusty brown, pointed, recurved scales, dry, margin incurved and often remaining so at maturity, coated with rusty brown fibers; gills notched, close, white, edges finely scalloped; spores 5–6 x 3.5–4 um, elliptic, smooth, hyaline, amyloid; scattered, in groups or clusters on decaying wood; edibility unknown: Leucopholiota decorosa (Peck) O.K. Universal veil present, usually leaving remnants (warts on cap or stalk, or volva); partial veil present in young specimens or margin striate or both; gills free or nearly so; terrestrial; never clustered; spores globose to elliptic, smooth, amyloid or inamyloid: Genus, 3. Decurrent means the gills run from the underside of the cap down to the stem and most of the way down. Cap smooth, convex to flat, often with an umbo, texture like leather, white to yellowish to dark brown, often hygrophanous; gills crowded, attached, never decurrent, white; stalk usually tall, slender, longitudinally-striate; often found on humus, sometimes on lawns, never on decaying wood; spores warty, with a plage, amyloid: Genus Melanoleuca Stalk central to eccentric: 2. 36. 10. 35. Cap glabrous, usually yellowish or with a yellow tint; gills pallid to greenish at first, becoming smoky gray at maturity; partial veil evident or not; usually growing on wood, humus, or in moss; spores usually smooth with an apical pore: Genus Hypholoma Usually found on the ground. 42. 2. Cap thin-fleshed, less than 2" (5 cm) wide, center depressed to sunken; gills decurrent; stalk 1/8" (3 mm) thick at most; spores smooth, inamyloid: Genus Chrysomphalina and Allies Cup: None. 4. Or they may be attached directly or by a … Gills becoming distinctly rust-colored, spore print distinctly rust-colored; young specimens with an obvious cortina, usually leaving at most a fibrous annular zone on the stalk; stalk often with a bulbous base; spores warty to finely wrinkled: Genus Cortinarius Cap brown, less than 1" (2.5 cm) wide, becoming minutely velvety to hairy in age; thin, membranous partial veil present in very young specimens; spores smooth, cylindric, weakly amyloid: Tectella patellaris (Fries) Murrill Gills are white and decurrent. Not as in any of the above choices: 45. Cap smooth, usually viscid; gill edges smooth, often remaining whitish at maturity; partial veil sparce, fibrous, usually evident only in young specimens, not leaving a ring; stalk often staining blue to greenish blue when bruised; spores smooth, with a truncate apical pore: Genus Psilocybe 18. Not as in either of the above choices, but spore print white to cream: 2. Cap and gills orange overall; gills somewhat decurrent, repeatedly and regularly forked but not crossveined; growing on or about decaying conifer wood or needle litter; spores elliptic to cylindric, smooth, mostly dextrinoid: Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca (Wulfen : Fries) Maire Spore print lilac or lilac-tinted, lilac-gray or violet-gray; cap often pinkish, usually finely scaly when dry; gills attached to decurrent, pinkish or flesh-colored to purplish, usually appearing thick and/or waxy; stalk fibrous, tough; spores inamyloid, minutely spiny except smooth in one species: Genus, 4. Usually growing in clusters of 10 or more specimens; caps viscid, yellowish brown to reddish brown; stalk dark brown and velvety at the base; spores smooth, elliptic, inamyloid: Flammulina velutipes (Fries) Karsten Not as in either of the above choices: 23. Cap usually white, gray, tan, brown, not typically colorful, often sunken to funnel-like; gills thin, usually distinctly decurrent; spores smooth to finely warty, typically inamyloid (amyloid in only a few species): Genus Clitocybe So a white mushroom with white gills is generally something to avoid.There are three exceptions to this rule that are edible, reasonably easy to recognise and have white gills. Cap hairy to scaly, tan to pale brown, less than 1½” (4 cm) wide; mushroom tough, not decaying readily; taste quite acrid; normally luminescing green when fresh (view in complete darkness for five–ten minutes); spores smooth, sausage-shaped, amyloid: 29. If a specimen does not key out in Clitocybe and Allies, try keying it out from: 32. Gills free to deeply notched, close; cap viscid, glabrous, conic to campanulate, more or less brown; partial veil absent; stalk with a long, tapering root; exclusively under conifers; spores roughened to finely wrinkled, lacking a pore, often with a snout-like projection: Genus. 40. 11. dry cap that is not hygrophanous, strongly decurrent gills, no partial veil and orange colours (often with white or brown). 3. Gray Bidartondo, M. I. Gill edges serrate (use a hand lens): 33. Spore print yellowish brown to brown, lacking an orange to red tint: 5. Gills well formed; cap silky, not powdery, white to grayish or pale tan; spores smooth, elliptic, inamyloid: Asterophora parasitica (Bulliard : Fries) Singer • HOME • lawn & garden mushrooms • mushroom links • medicinal mushrooms Order your autographed copy of Mushrooms of Northeastern North America now! Gill edges whitish, finely serrate; partial veil absent; cap minutely powdery or velvety; spores smooth, lacking an apical pore: 19. Cap smooth, dry to viscid, usually gray to brown or black; faces of gills becoming black-dotted in age, edges often whitish; partial veil absent; typically found on dung or in manured areas such as pastures, but sometimes on soil or in moss; spores smooth, with a flattened end and an apical pore: Genus Panaeolus Cap pinkish at first, fading to buff; gills decurrent, white to pinkish, some distinctly forked, typically crossveined; growing on or about decaying conifer wood or needle litter; odor strongly fragrant, reminiscent of bubble gum; spores 3–5 x 2–3 µm, elliptic, smooth, dextrinoid; edibility unknown: Hygrophoropsis olida (Quélet) Métrod Macroscopically not as in any of the above choices; spores smooth to roughened or appearing dotted, globose to elliptic or almond-shaped, inamyloid: Genus, 28. Not as in either of the above choices; odor often farinaceous; spores more or less elliptic, with longitudinal ridges, appearing angular only in end view: Genus, 27. 38. Cap 5/16-5/8" (8-15 mm) wide, entire fruiting body very similar to the previous choice, cap depressed over the disc with a tiny nipple-like projection at maturity; flesh whitish, odor spicy or not distinctive, taste not distinctive; spores 6-9 x 4-6 µm; scattered or in groups on decaying stems and leaves of grasses and other plants, sometimes on twigs; edibility unknown: Crinipellis scabella (Albertini and Schweinitz : Fries) Murrill = C. stipitaria (Fries) Patouillard The mushrooms have decurrent gills, short stems, and grow in a vertical pattern. 26. 42. Cap and stalk bright yellow, gills cream to yellow; cap scurfy to granular-mealy; growing on decaying deciduous logs or sticks; spores smooth, oval to elliptic, inamyloid: Cyptotrama asprata (Berkeley) Redhead and Ginns

white mushroom decurrent gills

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